Adventure Strip Finales

With the Amazing Spider-man comic strip going to reprints for the time being, Roy Thomas and Alex Saviuk’s run on the strip has come to an end. March 17 was the last Sunday with March 23 being the last daily.

Amazing Spider-Man – Roy Thomas, Alex Saviuk and Joe Sinnott
March 17, 2019
Amazing Spider-Man – Roy Thomas, Alex Saviuk and Joe Sinnott
March 23, 2019

The Spider-Man strip started out January 3, 1977 written by Stan Lee and drawn by John Romita. Following Stan Lee’s run on the strip Roy Thomas had written the strip uncredited for a number of years (more on that at SyFy.com). Artists that followed Romita included Fred Kida, Larry Lieber, and most recently Alex Saviuk with Joe Sinnott inks.

After the announcement of the strip’s finale, Joe Sinnott’s son Mark posted the following to his Dad’s Facebook page.

Truly the end of an era!

With adventure strips being far and few between on today’s comics page, I thought it would be of interest to look at a few notable comic strip finales.

Note: Thanks to Allen Lane who posted a number of these to the Yahoo Classic Adventure Comic Strip Group.


Buz Sawyer was created by Roy Crane and first appeared November 1, 1943. Crane worked on the strip until his death in 1977. Crane’s replacement was Henry G. Schlensker who worked on the strip from 1977-1983. Schlensker was followed by John Celardo who worked on it from 1983–1989. Upon Celardo’s sign-off, King Features discontinued the strip.

Buz Sawyer – John Celardo
October 7, 1989

Buck Rogers by writer Philip Francis Nowlan and artist Dick Calkins debuted on January 7, 1929. Writers following Nolan included Rick Yager (who also drew it), Jack Lehti, Ray Russell, Fritz Leiber and Howard Liss. Artists following Calkins included Russell Keaton, Rick Yager and George Tuska.

Howard Liss and George Tuska’s finale strip appeared June 13, 1965.

Buck Rogers – Howard Liss and George Tuska
June 13, 1965

The strip was given a second life in 1979 by writer Jim Lawrence and artist Gray Morrow, followed by writer Cary Bates and artist Jack Sparling. The finale strip appearing December 25, 1983.

Buck Rogers – Cary Bates and Jack Sparling
December 25, 1983

One of the most memorable finales for a comic strip happened before the strip in question actually even ended. I’m talking of course of Milton Caniff’s Terry and the Pirates.

Looking to have the financial stability of ownership of his strip (something Caniff was denied at Tribune-News Syndicate with Terry), he accepted an offer from the Field Newspaper Syndicate to create a new strip that he would have ownership of. That strip would be Steve Canyon.

In Caniff’s iconic final Sunday page Terry says goodbye to Jane Allen as Caniff says goodbye to his Terry and the Pirates readers.

The story so far – Romance is in the air for Terry and Jane Allen until it’s discovered that her old flame, Snake Tumblin, is still alive and in a base hospital somewhere in Australia. Sacrificing his own happiness, Terry secures Jane a flight and escorts her to the airfield…

Terry and the Pirates – Milton Caniff
December 29, 1946

That last panel is the killer as Caniff adds a double meaning to the writing on the wall.

As pointed out by R.C. Harvey in the foreward to the Complete Terry and the Pirates Volume 6, the Sunday page was not the last strip Caniff drew. Because the Sunday pages were due well in advance of the dailies, the following daily strip – printed the day before the momentous final Sunday page – was actually the last strip drawn.

Terry and the Pirates – Milton Caniff
December 28, 1946

Caniff’s replacement on Terry and the Pirates would be George Wunder, who would go on to draw the strip for another 26 years. Here’s Wunder’s last Sunday page.

Terry and the Pirates – George Wunder
February 25, 1973

Terry and the Pirates would be revived in 1995 by Michael Uslan with art by the Brothers Hildebrandt. The following year they left the strip and were replaced by writer Jim Clark and artist Dan Spiegle. A year after that the strip was discontinued.

Terry and the Pirates – Jim Clark and Dan Spiegle
July 27, 1997

Secret Agent X-9 began on January 22, 1934. It was created by writer Dashiell Hammett (The Maltese Falcon) and drawn by artist Alex Raymond (Flash Gordon). Writers that followed Hammett in those early years included Don Moore and Leslie Charteris. The artists that followed after Raymond left the strip were Nicholas Afonsky and Austin Briggs. In the 1940s Mel Graff took over the writing and drawing chores, followed by Bob Lubbers (pseudonym “Bob Lewis”) in the 1960s.

From 1967 to 1980 the strip was written by Archie Goodwin and drawn by Al Williamson and relaunched as Secret Agent Corrigan. Here’s Goodwin and Williamson’s last strip from February 2, 1980.

Secret Agent Corrigan – Archie Goodwin and Al Williamson
February 2, 1980

Following Goodwin and Williamson was veteran cartoonist George Evans. Evans would write and draw the strip until 1980. Upon Evans’s decision to retire from producing the strip, King opted to discontinue it.

Secret Agent Corrigan – George Evans
February 10, 1996

Another comic strip Alex Raymond started back in 1934 was the topper to his famous Flash Gordon strip, and that was Jungle Jim. Artists that followed Raymond on the strip were John Mayo and Paul Norris. After a 20 year run Jungle Jim wrapped up in 1954.

Jungle Jim – Paul Norris
August 8, 1954

Rip Kirby premiered March 4, 1946 and was also created by Alex Raymond. Raymond’s work on Rip Kirby would win him the Reuben Award in 1949 for “Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year.”

Alex Raymond’s career was cut short in 1956, when at age 46, he was killed in a car crash. King Features sought out a replacement and found it in John Prentice. After John Prentice died in 1999 (after an amazing 43 year run on Rip Kirby) the decision was made by King Features to discontinue the strip. Frank Bolle would ghost the final week (to “ghost is when an artist fills in for another artist by mimicking his style).

Rib Kirby – Ghosted by Frank Bolle
June 26, 1999

Alex Raymond’s most renowned comic strip, Flash Gordon, first appeared January 7, 1934. It has had a number of artists and writers over the years (myself included), some of whom I highlighted on this Sunday page.

Flash Gordon – December 26, 1999.

Quick side note: Bob Fujatani (who worked with Dan Barry on Flash Gordon) gave a great interview recently to the the Connecticut Post talking about his career in comics. Here’s the link: At 97, Flash Gordon Artist Bob Fujitani Remembers Cartooning’s Golden Age


The Flash Gordon Dailies were discontinued on two occasions. The first in 1944 shows Flash, Dale and Dr. Zarkov in a ticker tape parade having returned from Mongo after successfully saving the Earth.

Flash Gordon – Austin Briggs
June 3, 1944

The dailies were revived in the 1950s with artist Dan Barry at the helm. In 1990 the dailies were taken over by Bruce Jones as writer and Ralph Reese as artist, followed by artist Gray Morrow upon Reese’s departure. A Buenos Aires studio of artists were hired in 1991 with writing alternating between Kevin Van Hook and Thomas Warkentin. The last daily would be in 1993

Flash Gordon – Thomas Warkentin and a Buenos Aires studio
July 3, 1993

Meanwhile the Flash Gordon Sunday page had been running continuously since 1934. I started my tenure writing/drawing Flash on January 21, 1996. It was a fun run, but after a failed contract renegotiation, I deciding to bow out. My last strip, and Flash Gordon’s finale, appeared March 16, 2003.

Flash Gordon – Jim Keefe
March 16, 2003

The inspiration for my sign-off was the ending of the first Flash Gordon serial starring Buster Crabbe (Flash Gordon), Jean Rogers (Dale Arden) and Frank Shannon (Dr. Zarkov).

Flash Gordon serial – 1936

Originally I had a slightly more surreal ending planned in a Sunday page I did in collaboration with Mutts creator Patrick McDonnell. It was never meant to be though as the page was rejected by the editor up at King Features – his thoughts being “It really didn’t work as a Flash Gordon page.”

Patrick did an end run though and asked the editor, that if it wasn’t going to see print as a Flash Gordon page, could it be used as a Mutts page. The go ahead was given and it eventual saw print on March 23, 2003 as a Mutts Sunday page (with the Flash Gordon title kept intact).

Mutts – Jim Keefe and Patrick McDonnell
March 23, 2003

Note: As mentioned, these are just a FEW notable adventure strip finales. Any more you think are missing? Enter your suggestions in the comments section below.

Closing Thoughts…

Adventure strips reigned when newspapers comic strips were printed large and there was room to tell a story. Just compare the two Sunday pages below from 1934 and 2002.

On the left, Flash Gordon 2/25/1934 by AlexRaymond.
On the right, Flash Gordon 11/10/2002 by Joe Kubert.

Since 2002 (the image on the above right) comic strip Sunday pages have regrettably shrunken even smaller. Here’s an example of my hometown paper the Star Tribune (my hand shown on the bottom left for scale). Unless you have a jewelers eye loupe you’re at a loss…


Here’s a comic page artist Terry Beatty (Ms. Tree, Rex Morgan M.D.) wrote and drew for Big Funny back in 2009 that really drives the point home.

Big Funny – Terry Beatty

Granted all is not doom and gloom – whereas adventure strips in the newspaper may be withering on the vine, we’re in a golden age as far as comic strip collections being published. Check out the Library of American Comics, and Fantagraphics to name just a few.

I also feel like comic strips, and in particular continuity strips, are being given a renewed life and readership online as fans of the medium now have the ability to binge weeks worth at a time. The big two comic strip sites being King Feature’s Comics Kingdom and AMU’s GoComics.

And even though comic book sales have shrunk over the years, graphic novels have increased in popularity. From a recent article in Publishers Weekly; “Over the past five years, the North American graphic novel market has welcomed a wave of new readers and grown from about $805 million in sales in 2012 to more than $1 billion in 2017.”


In the early 1900s onwards comic strips reigned supreme. By the 1940s comic books had taken off. In the 1960s indie comics/undergrounds entered the fray. In the 1980s self-published/alternative comics joined in at the same time graphic novels were just getting their sea legs. In the 1990s online content joined the mix. And now in the 21st century graphic novels have taken flight. And that’s not to say comic strips and comic books have been replaced and have gone away, it’s just that they aren’t the only game in town anymore.

Cartoons, comics, graphic novels – whatever you want to call it – the packaging keeps changing, but sequential art is just as popular now as it’s ever been. And as long as the stories are strong and the artwork delivers, the art form will continue to have an audience.

And that’s my two cents. See you in the funny papers…

-Jim Keefe

About Jim Keefe

Jim Keefe is the current artist of the Sally Forth comic strip, he is also the writer and artist of the Flash Gordon comic strip - both available at ComicsKingdom.com. A graduate of the Joe Kubert School, Keefe likewise teaches Comic Art. Teaching and speaking engagements include SVA in Manhattan, Hofstra’s UCCE Youth Programs, The University of Minnesota and most recently the Minneapolis College of Art and Design.
This entry was posted in Al Williamson, Alex Raymod, Artists - Cartoonists, Flash Gordon, Ramblings & Reviews and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Adventure Strip Finales

  1. keefestudios says:

    The Daily Cartoonist did a great addendum to this post showing how all these strips first premiered – check it out at http://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2019/03/25/first-and-last-a-jim-keefe-bonus-round/

  2. zookningel says:

    I can’t find a copy of it but Twin Earths had a finale with Chris and Nan addressing the readers.

    • Allen Lane says:

      If there is a way to post images here I’d be happy to past a copy of the last Twin Earths daily strip (5/25/63) as well as a few other adventure strip finales that had some sort of resolution. The Twin Earth definitely did have the characters addressing the readers in the final panel. After proposing to Nan, Chris says “I don’t think our readers would be interested in the affairs of an old married couple, do you Nan?” To which she replies “No, but we’ll be waiting to see you when Earth’s space travelers discover Terra… on the other side of the sun!”

  3. While I too lament the slow death of the daily adventure strips… They morphed into comics which are now starting to fade, but are giving way as you have said to the emergence of the modern graphic novel. The medium and its delivery agent is only changing with the times, I don’t think it will ever go away.

  4. Allen Lane says:

    Jim – Thanks for the bittersweet look back at the swan songs of some of the great action/adventure strips of our time. Unfortunately so many of them (like Buck Rogers) had long since passed their prime by the end. Flash Gordon is one of the exceptions. I have always your run on the strip in very high regard. It’s obvious you were a true fan of the strip, paying homage to Raymond’s original run while still making it fresh and up to date. And the artwork was amazing to boot! I never realized your last panel was a tribute to the first movie serial – what a great Easter egg! And thanks for helping to keep interest in classic comic strips alive with your blog!

  5. It’s long past time you wrote a book about comics and comics strips! Thanks, Jim.

  6. Paul Berge says:

    Fascinating!
    Your post here reminded me to finally look up whatever happened to create the daily and Sunday WTF endings of the soap “The Adventures of Robin Malone,” which used to run atop the front page of our Sunday comics page. The Sundays ended with Malone’s ward in a fiery car crash, and the dailies ended with a silhouette — either Robin or her brainwashed husband — plummeting from the roof of a penthouse.
    Found that story here:http://cartoonician.com/the-life-and-death-of-robin-bob-lubbers-robin-malone/

  7. Michael D Fraley says:

    Wonderful post … and a bit sad for us fans who remember some of these farewells. Thanks Jim.

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