Categories
George Evans

Jane Martin by George Evans

Appearing in Fiction House’s Wings Comics in the 1940s, Jane Martin’s adventures started as a nurse during WWII – in the years to follow she would add ace pilot, spy and intrepid reporter to her repotoire.

Written by F E Lincoln (perhaps a “house name” and not a real person), a number of artists worked on the feature, one of which was George Evans.

Spotlighted below is a page by Evans, followed by a commission piece he did over fifty years later.

Detail from previous image.

To check out some of Jane Martin’s adventures, check out the following blogs…

Artwork by George Evans:
itsthatnosydame.blogspot.com

Artwork by Fran Hopper:
timebulleteer.wordpress.com


Jane Martin’s Golden Age Appearances: Wings Comics #1-59, 61-111

For more on Wings Comics check out the Grand Comics Database.

Categories
Flash Gordon George Evans

Flash Gordon 8/6/2000 – George Evans

Today’s Flash Gordon page (11/25/2012) originally appeared August 6, 2000. Since it focuses on Secret Agent Corrigan and his team the first tier has a group shot with artwork by veteran Secret Agent artist, George Evans.

For a larger version, just click on the artwork. For more on Evans’ work on Secret Agent Corrigan check out my previous blog post for art and links aplenty:
George Evans – Secret Agent Corrigan


I really wanted to show that Dale wasn’t just a damsel in distress in this storyline – that she’d play an active role.

Today’s strip just emphasizes that fact – which will have ramifications for Corrigan later…


As always, to follow Flash Gordon online check out King Features subscription service at: DailyInk.com

You’ll also Find:

The Phantom
by Tony DePaul (Scripts), Paul Ryan (Daily Art) & Terry Beatty (Sunday Art)

Prince Vailiant
by Mark Schultz and Tom Yeates

The Amazing Spider-Man
by Stan Lee (Scripts), Larry Lieber (Daily Art) and Alex Saviuk & Joe Sinnott (Sunday Art)

Vintage Strips like:
Juliet Jones by Stan Drake
Big Ben Bolt by John Cullen Murphy
Flash Gordon by Dan Barry (Daily Art) & Mac Raboy (Sunday Art)
Rip Kirby by Alex Raymond

And much, much more…

Note: This is not a paid endorsement.
Please resume your normal internet surfing at this time.

Categories
George Evans

Secret Agent Corrigan by George Evans

Taking over after Archie Goodwin and Al Williamson’s run, George Evans’ first daily for Secret Agent Corrigan hit newspapers on February 4, 1980. He had ghosted for Williamson occasionally, but now he was at the helm as writer and artist. Evans continued on the strip for the next sixteen years.

I was first introduced to George Evans’ artistry while working on staff at King Features Syndicate. Ignorant of the huge body of work he had done, I was immediately drawn to the action-packed and beautifully illustrated job he was doing on the strip.

Secret Agent Corrigan May 20, 1992
Secret Agent Corrigan March 11, 1992
Secret Agent Corrigan April 20, 1994

Striking up a correspondance with him, he was more than willing to try to assist a newcomer like myself that was just breaking into the field. The following is a Flash Gordon Sunday page I sent George for critique with the latter being his suggestions on tracing paper.

Click on image to see larger.
George Evans

Because of the decline of adventure strips in newspapers, George Evans’ work on Secret Agent Corrigan didn’t reach the wider audience that would have appreciated it. Maurice Horn lamented this fact in his book, 100 Years of American Newpaper Comics:

“It is unfortunate that because of (Secret Agent Corrigan’s) limited circulation, few people are able to read and appreciate one of the genuinely interesting action strips still extant, a strip carried on in dashing style by Evans.”


Upon Evans’ retirement from the strip in 1996, King Features discontinued the strip.
The last daily saw print on February 10, 1996.

February 10, 1996
February 10, 1996

It wouldn’t be the last time Evans drew Secret Agent. In the summer of 2000 I started a storyline where Secret Agent and Flash Gordon would eventually cross paths (the two strips both originally drawn by Alex Raymond). The climactic page where they meet I handed over to Evans.

And here’s how it appeared in print.

For more Secret Agent Corrigan by George Evans check out IDW’s Secret Agent Corrigan Volume 6. I highly recommend it!

Categories
Craig MacIntosh

Craig MacIntosh – The Last Lightning

Craig MacItosh, author of The Fortunate Orphans, has a new book coming out…

Click on picture to get info on purchasing.

Synopsis:

Nearly seventy years after a top-secret escort mission flown by four American aces ends mysteriously, a missionary in Papua New Guinea makes a startling discovery. One of the missing planes—a P-38 Lightning belonging to the flight leader—is found deep in the jungle. Half a world away, others who learn of the surprising discovery race to unlock the past. Greed, betrayal, and brutality descend on an isolated valley where tribal life, unchanged for a century, is about to be visited by a whirlwind of violence.

“A great story . . . you won’t want to put this book down.”

—Col. Perry Dahl, USAF (Ret.), WWII veteran and P-38 ace, 432nd Fighter Squadron, Southwest Pacific Theater

“MacIntosh has skillfully blended interesting fact with intriguing fiction to capture the experiences of our combat aircrews of WWII and the impact on their immediate families and descendants.”

—Brig. Gen. Dennis Shulstad, USAF (Ret.)

Author Craig MacIntosh

Events:

Launch Party

Oct. 13, 1 to 4 pm: the American Legion in Apple Valley, Minnesota.
14521 Granada Drive – Apple Valley, MN 55214

Book Signing

Nov. 11, 3 pm: the American Legion in Rosemount, Minnesota.
14590 Burma Avenue West – Rosemount, MN 55068

Book Signing

December 4th, 6:30 – 8:00pm: the Robert Trail Library.
14395 Robert Trail South – Rosemount, Minnesota 55068
Craig MacIntosh will be the featured speaker in the ongoing “Meet the Author” series.


When not writing, Craig MacIntosh can be found in the Sunday paper, with fellow cartoonist Steve Sack, in their Sunday comics feature Doodles. MacIntosh also illustrates the comic strip Sally Forth, written by Francesco Marciuliano, which appears in over 600 papers.


UPDATE: Book Launch on October 13th at the American Legion in Apple Valley, MN.

Here’s some pics from Craig MacIntosh’s book launch party for The Last Lightning, including a WWII reenactor that was on hand who introduced Craig.

– WWII Reenactor –

Craig MacIntosh recounting his trip to New Guinea as an MIA hunter.

Craig and his wife Linda at the book signing table.

Craig Macintosh

Categories
Artist Spotlight Artists - Cartoonists Dick Guindon

Guindon

Recently came across the following collection of Dick Guindon cartoons at a used book store.

Published by the Minneapolis Tribune – 1977

Back cover photo. Notice the Minneapolis skyline is only the IDS and the Foshay.

Here’s the copy that went with the photo shown above:

“Dick Guindon’s first cartoons, dealing with a character called Hugger Mugger, were published in the Minnesota Daily. Hugger Mugger eventually was syndicated and appeared in 100 college newspapers. Guindon then went to New York, where, as a freelance cartoonist, he sold his work to Downbeat, Playboy, Esquire and New York Magazine. The Realist sent him abroad for a year as a kind of cartoonist-correspondent in Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Jordan and Israel. Guindon was born December 2, 1935, in St. Paul. He began cartooning when he finished three years in the army, and he joined the Minneapolis Tribune in 1968.”

And here’s Guindon in his own words from the foreword…

I grew up on Guindon – he’s one of my favorites.
His cartoons nailed the archetypal Minnesotan in a way that no one else has come close. The caricatures in the Coen brothers movie Fargo are the popular stereotype, but Guindon goes more to the core.





In 1981 Guindon moved from Minneapolis to Detroit.
I found the following time capsule of the event on YouTube.
There are quick cameos of a young Louie Anderson and Garrison Keillor among others…


And here’s an interview with Guindon in Detroit.


Tragedy struck in April 1987 when the studio Guindon had in a historic four-story building in Traverse City, Michigan was destroyed by fire. More than 5,000 cartoons and sketches burned.

Click on image to see larger.


In February 2005 Patty Stearns interviewed Guindon for Traverse Magazine.
Here’s a few excerpts…

Gaze over to the floor-to-ceiling bookcases in
Guindon’s living/dining room and scan the titles: The
Catcher in the Rye, Marcella’s Italian Kitchen, Salt: A
World History, The Lies of George W. Bush.
There’s an
entire section devoted to the works of novelist Elmore
“Dutch” Leonard, whose late wife, Carol, brought back
one of Guindon’s prized espresso pots from a trip to
Europe. A case of the cartoonist’s favorite wine,
Côtes du Rhône, fills another couple of shelves.
Next to that stands a three-quarter-sized rendition
of the artist himself—a painted board with a cutout
for a wristwatch, which is missing. Guindon calls
it his “Grandfather Clock,” although he is not yet
a grandfather.


Guindon has produced cartoons that are part of the Smithsonian
Institution’s Archives of American Art and The Ohio
State University Cartoon Research Library. He has authored
six books, and collectors sell pieces of his life from galleries and
over the Internet for big bucks.

None of this has gone to his head.


Guindon has never socialized much with his fellow cartoonists.
“I find them a little bit sad, frankly,” he says. “They
tend to work on kitchen tables and not think of themselves
very professionally and that sort of thing.” He gets a smirk on
his face.

You never really know when he’s kidding.


“Everyone who’s ever been around me is always surprised by
how much goes into it, because you always think, well, they’re
just potato heads,” Guindon says.

But screenwriter Kurt Luedtke, a friend and former executive
editor of the Free Press, has seen this artist in action.
“The truth about Guindon is that he draws unusually well; a
lot of folks miss that, I think, perceiving him as a very funny
guy with an offbeat sense of humor who’s a cartoonist. Study
those panels for a while and you realize that his oblique take
on life is just the beginning of a process that really ends with
a masterful pen.”


According to Wikipedia, Guindon announced his retirement that same year.

To wherever Guindon is now, I raise a glass of Côtes du Rhône in salute…


1/17/2013 Update:
Check out more of Guindon’s work at The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum Blog.