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Al Williamson Business of Cartooning Sally Forth

Homage or Swipe?

Okay, here’s the deal from my vantage point – and a heads up to newcomers in the field.

If you are copying or lifting a drawing from another artist and not giving that artist credit, that’s a swipe. If you do give them credit it’s an homage.

And giving credit is a very simple thing to do. Just write the word, “after” – then the artist’s name.

Here’s an example. On the left is Al Williamson’s original drawing – and on the right my drawing with the accompanying credit line.

Sally.Flash


Here’s another one. Mark Schultz using a mirror image of a Williamson pose – then putting the credit line in reverse as well.

WeirdFantasy.XenozoicTales


Last but not least, Joe Jusko after John Buscema.

buscema.Jusko


A credit line is a tip of the hat to the hard work another artist has done which you are standing on the shoulders of. And generally speaking, artists get enough crap without getting ripped off by other artists (see Rob Granito). Give credit where credit is due.


And speaking of credit…

The Schultz image I grabbed off the blogspot ilovecomiccovers. There are lots more side by side comparisons to be had there – go check them out.

And for more of Jusko’s work, check out www.joejusko.com.

Categories
Al Williamson Alex Raymod Flash Gordon

Flash Gordon 8/20/2000 – Inspired by T-Boz

Originally posted 12/9/2012. Updated 1/2/2013.

The Flash Gordon strip rereleased by King Features today (12/9/2012) originally ran on August 20, 2000.

I had met with legendary cartoonist Al Williamson just a couple years prior and showed him how I had updated Prince Thun from Alex Raymond’s original version – suffice it to say he gave me a look (with an eyebrow raised) that said “Really..?”

I decided to stay true to the Raymond version from then on out.

My initial updating of Prince Thun – whereas the Lion-Man looked more like a lion.
Modeling Thun after Raymond's version.
Modeling Thun after Raymond’s version.

One way to flesh out a character you’re creating is to use a model or picture reference for inspiration. Here’s an example of Alex Raymond doing as much – modeling Captain Sudin after matinee idol Errol Flynn.


For King Vultan’s headstrong daughter Princess Tyree I needed a character who just radiated strength and self-confidence.

I went with Tionne Watkins – or T-Boz from TLC.


It’s amazing how much easier a character is to write and draw once you have a clear image of them in your head – it ends up changing your story in ways you hadn’t even imagined. What came out of using T-Boz for inspiration was that when Princess Tyree first meets Flash Gordon – she’s not all that impressed…

Tyree.2

In Writing 101 you learn to avoid cliches. One of the cliches for Flash Gordon stories is that the female characters all swoon over him. In this respect I thought Tyree would be a welcome change.

Flash2000_08_20

It’s said that strong characters write themselves, it’s not entirely the case, but it sure gives you more tools in your toolbox to work with.

Close-up of original art.
Artwork from the August 20, 2000 Flash Gordon Sunday page.

The toolbox analogy is from Stephen King. For more on the craft of writing I recommend reading King’s On Writing. One of the best books out there on the subject as far as I’m concerned.

All for now. And as always, to follow Flash Gordon online check out:


Update: For more strips from this story, check out: Flash Gordon – Princess T-Boz

Categories
Al Williamson Artists - Cartoonists George Evans

The Artists of EC Comics

The following is a clip spotlighting the artists of EC Comics from the 2004 documentary, Tales from the Crypt: From Comic Books to Television. That they got Bernie Wrightson talking about Graham ingels work is reason enough to check it out.

Note: In cases where they show an artist and not a name, I went in with iMovie and added it.

The documentary first aired in 2004 on the AMC Channel, it’s also featured on the Tales from the Crypt complete first season DVD set, and was also released on its own on DVD as a 2-disc set.


As an added bonus, the following are a few of the EC “Artist of the Issue” spotlights that I found over at: jeffoverturf.blogspot.com
I’d recommend checking it out as Jeff has a ton of great material posted.

Click on image to view larger.
Click on image to view larger.
Click on image to view larger.
Click on image to view larger.