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Artist Spotlight Artists - Cartoonists Conventions Jose Delbo

Artist Spotlight: Jose Delbo

One of the first teachers I had when I attended the Joe Kubert School was Jose Delbo.

One of the exercises he would have us do every week was draw horses. The following are a few examples I kept (circa 1987). Jose’s corrections are in pen over my pencils.

“This horse is drawn so stiff it belongs on a carousel.”

“This horse is drawn so stiff it looks like a robot .”

“No one could ride a horse drawn like this.”

Jose Delbo was a great teacher because he wouldn’t let an inferior drawing slide. When you got a compliment or a good grade from him you knew it was well deserved.

I got the chance to catch up with Jose Delbo at SpringCon 2012 in Minneapolis and I had him sign the drawings shown above. I showed him some of my more recent work and he made a point of telling me I was really doing some good work – so good in fact that he would pass on a script he had just received.

A cowboy strip – lots of horses…

Jose Delbo and his wife Maybelle at SpringCon 2012.

A quick remembrance of a cartooning class taught by Jose.

A student was getting critiqued – during the critique Jose stated that the student needed to spend more time on his work. The student responded that he had already worked on the page for two weeks. Jose replied, “How much of that time was actually pen to paper.”

I never forgot that insight. It doesn’t matter how much time you have to work on something if you’re not putting pen to paper.

Jose Delbo - 2011 Pic by Andrew Satterfield - Cincinnati Comic Expo
Jose Delbo – 2011
Pic by Andrew Satterfield – Cincinnati Comic Expo

Jose Delbo – a fantastic artist and teacher.
For more, check out JoseDelbo.org

Categories
Conventions

Autoptic 2018

AUTOPTIC 2018
Minneapolis’s Premier Comic and Independent Print Festival
Sunday, August 19th, 2018

Aria Event Center – Minneapolis, MN

Aria Event Center

Aria Event Center

Aria Event Center

Jim Keefe and Amaya Goldsmith with their Spider-Man action figures.

Robin Sheldon & Nick Peters

Rachel Topka

JBROE and M.S. Harkness

Ben Tye and Alex Araiza

Melissa Mariko Kieselburg and Marissa Luna

Kyle Harabedian

Ashby Utting

Lindsay Nohl and Calvin

John Bivens

Zander Cannon

Will Dinski

Jack Kotz and Ben Tye

Spencer Amundson and Jack Kotz

Zak Sally with unauthorized Sammy the Mouse™ plushy.

Tom Kaczynski

Mason Sklar

Kevin Huizenga

Mandie Brasington and Alexis Cooke

Alex Mitchell

Ari Mulch

Craig Thompson signing and sketching for fans.

Paul Fricke with daughter, Emily

Scotty Gillmer, Carl Thompson and Bart King

Tyler Page

Rosemary Valero-O’Connell


And last but not least…

Seen driving by the Aria. I take it this is the standard vehicle for all artists in attendance.


So that wraps another fantastic Autoptic Arts Festival.
This is a great show in that it is artist centric and really highlights the talent of the comic art community here in the Twin Cities.

Many thanks to all the hard working organizers who put on a great show.
All I can say in closing is that I’m already looking forward to the next one!

Categories
Business of Cartooning Conventions Steve Bissette

Networking and the High Cost of Comic Conventions

Artist Alley at C2E2 in Chicago.

It’s been my experience that networking is the key in getting work in the art field. I know it seems basic but it bears repeating that if an employer is not familiar with you and your work then they won’t hire you. And this is not a matter of “it’s not what you know but who you know.”

The following is from The Essential Principles Of Graphic Design by Debbie Millman.

“The most delusional graphic design belief system is this: becoming a successful graphic designer is all about being an extraordinarily talented designer. It is not. Talent is only one part of the equation for a successful career in graphic design. In fact, in the field of professional graphic design, talent is simply what is considered “operational excellence” in business school. Talent is essentially a given, a point of entry. A career in graphic design brings with it the assumption that you have talent, and in isolation, talent will not guarantee success for any designer or design program.”

For more from Debbie Millman, check out her podcast at Design Matters Media.


One great way to network is comic conventions – but it can get costly. I was a guest at Dragon Con awhile back and had a complimentary table that otherwise would have cost $500 (at that time). I sold more stuff than at any other convention I’ve been at – but still couldn’t break-even after I added up the cost of airfare, hotel and meals.

What balanced it out for me and made it worthwhile was the networking. Along with the standard touching base with fans and other professionals in the business, I was interviewed for two podcasts – Sidebar and Comics Coast-to-Coast– which was great publicity.

Doing some commission sketches at Dragon-Con.

The following is some hands-on experience from artists/cartoonists from the trenches.


Tyler Page back in 2010 did a great post where he broke down the cost of self-publishing and promotion for his book Stylish Vittles. In part 2 of the post he cited convention costs over a seven year span.

“…the grand total of all my business expenses from 2002 through the printing of Nothing Better Vol 2 in late 2009 is $46,918.60. Yes, that is a lot of money. It is. But it’s important to realize that was spent over the course of 7 years – it’s not like I dropped it all at once. I also tried to be as thrifty as possible in my spending when I could, especially when traveling.”

“In the end it wasn’t the cost of printing books that really rang up the bills – it was the traveling and conventions.”

Excerpt from Publishing Pt. 2 – How Much is This Going to Cost Me?

– Click on image to go to Tyler’s Tumblr –


Daniel Davis of Steam Crow LLC had an informative blog post where he related his experience exhibiting at the 2011 San Diego Comic-Con in regards to what works and what doesn’t. In summation he noted;

“It’s getting more difficult to profit at comic conventions, but I’ve seen it done, and know that it’s possible. It’s no longer a space where one can simply show up, and expect to profit. But, with ample year-long preparation, and strategy, it is doable.”

Daniel and Dawna Davis


Steve Bissette (Swamp Thing, Tyrant, Taboo, and current instructor at The Center for Cartoon Studies) has years of experience as an artist and publisher.

Godzilla sketch – Steve Bissette

The following is an excerpt from a Facebook post of his where he did a comic con post-mortem.

“Professionally, it ratified all the reasons I stopped investing in conventions…

In short, while I met some great people, signed a ton of SWAMP THINGs, and had fun with my cronies, I didn’t get to see/shop/experience the con outside of my table space; my being there didn’t sell even ONE World of Strange Bissette t-shirt (and we were just an aisle apart, right NEXT to each other!); I didn’t make a dime on sales (lost $$ after shipping costs); and my add’t commitment to a three-lecture/workshop day following was a wash, at best (again, personally, great to do; didn’t earn me a dime).

Had I paid for travel/table, I’d have busted my entire fall budget at home to do the one convention. Whatever I made at the table, I spent eating during my stay (and spent more). If I’m going to travel, it’s going to be TRAVEL, with Marge, to see friends/family, not to do cons.

Just being pragmatic. I mean, look. I’m thankful I went, and thankful Rick, Tom, John, and I have so many folks who came out to see us! Folks & our fans are great—kind, generous in their comments, and all want their SWAMP THINGs signed, but most of ’em sample nothing else, by and large. Money’s tight everywhere, particularly these days, and SWAMP THING is still all folks want from us, and those they’ve got. Whatever else I have, I’m better off selling via online sales. In fact, only ONE person bought one of everything new from the table.”


I’m often asked from readers/fans which upcoming comic conventions I’ll be at. In general, not too many, as I’ve cut down on going to cons. If I do attend a con it’s likely because it’s close to home (because of cost), and if I do a show out of town it’s usually because I have family living in the area that I can visit and save money on hotels by crashing at their homes.

My daughter Tessa and I at the MCBA’s ComiCon here in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Another big deterrent is the time involved, which if it coincides with a tight deadline can be MURDER. I’ve tabled at way too many cons where I’ve had to bring work, which just ends up being a disservice to fans looking to say hello and should be avoided at all cost. Add to that the time it takes to recover from that kind of scheduling and it’s lose-lose situation all the way around.

Is tabling at a convention worth the time and effort? If you go in ill-prepared you’ll probably just end up pissing money down the drain, with no benefit other than the same enjoyment any random attendee walking through the door could have had.

If you attack a convention in a business sense where you’re budgeting cost and working your butt off (commission sketches/networking/research trends) then yes they are. If you want to work in this business, I’d advise treating it as such.


I’ll end with some stellar advice from Colleen Doran (A Distant Soil, Amazing Fantastic Incredible Stan Lee, Troll Bridge). This is related to networking and making the effort to get your work out there…

Colleen Doran at Wizard World 2017 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

“Lots of people assume that the reason they can’t get hired is because publishing is some kind of closed circle. It’s really not. Clients are always looking for new talent. REALLY. They are DYING to hire the next JK Rowling, the next Jim Lee, the next James Patterson. Who doesn’t want another money-maker?

The truth is, almost everything that comes over the transom is not very good. When I write this, aspiring creators cringe thinking “Oh, she means me.” No, I don’t. If you have any idea of the level of just how bad submissions are, you would be appalled. It is rare to see anything of quality. I don’t know anyone in publishing who enjoys going over submissions, because it’s depressing. If you are good and if you’ve got something to show, DON’T GIVE UP. Trust me, clients are DYING to find you.

SECOND THING: a major reason clients don’t like to hire new people is they have a tendency to screw the pooch at an alarmingly high rate. The joy of creating for fun evaporates when you HAVE to create. Creating all the time: not so simple. And, especially in comics, the workload is awesome. Almost everyone in graphic arts will try to steer you away from comics and toward advertising because comics pay is usually terrible and advertising is less work. I can’t tell you how many people I’ve tried to hire up from fandom who have completely vapor-locked, including people I’ve tried to hire from other areas of publishing…

Everything in comics is labor intensive and often techy and boring these days, since artists have to do their own production work. You have to really know what you are doing. So, next time you think that publisher isn’t going to give you a chance, think of it from the publisher’s point of view. If your portfolio is good, and you show a real, steely willingness to produce there’s a publisher looking for you.

Really. Don’t give up.”

For more on Colleen Doran, go to ColleenDoran.com
or check out her Patreon at patreon.com/ColleenDoran

Categories
Conventions

Everett K. Ross at C2E2

Word on the street was that Ulysses Klaue was in Chicago April sixth through the eighth looking to fence a stash of stolen Vibranium. My Command Center for the weekend was at McCormick Place – concurrent to some convention called C2E2 (whatever that is).

As luck would have it I found an ally.
Enter – The Black Panther!

Unfortunately before we could pool our resources, Doctor Otto Octavius (street name Doctor Octopus) attacked! Thankfully Spider-Man happened on the scene and was able to subdue him before any injuries were incurred.

Derailed on my search for Klaue, I ran into a new formidable adversary…
Killmonger!

I’ll add that he was NOT at all happy that I called him “Killraven” by mistake.
The look he gave me after the fact was to die for – literally.

But before Killmonger could wipe that smug look off my face, we were set upon by Galactus, devourer of worlds!

Thinking fast, I made it known to the all-powerful Galactus where the nearest McDonalds was (to satiate his endless hunger) and the threat was over.
But Killmonger had escaped!

I barely had time to catch my breath before running into none other than…

Killmonger…AGAIN!

And he had obviously bulked up since our last encounter (something about a heart-shaped herb he ingested – a plant native to Wakanda).

But before he could exact his revenge on me, I was saved  by the combined forces of none other than  Supergirl and Wonder Woman!

My mind reeling from the licensing and copyright issues of a DC/Warner Brothers & Marvel/Disney crossover, I commandeered the nearest vehicle and made my escape.

All in all a successful assignment.

Categories
Conventions MCAD

Autoptic 2015 – Minneapolis, MN

PFC Exhibit
(“Pierre Feuille Ciseaux” or “Rock Paper Scissors”)
at MCAD prior to Autoptic – August 7, 2015

Bart King, June Julien Misserey and Jenny King

Mathieu Bouillant (facing camera)

Barbara Schulz.

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Light Grey Art Lab Exhibit
prior to Autoptic – August 7, 2015

Street in front of the Light Grey Art Lab Exhibit
Jean-Christophe Menu (pink shirt), June Julien Misserey (dark grey shirt), Mathieu Bouillant (to the right of June holding camera), Mathilde Harmand (holding proofsheet), Marina Courtois (in red), Paulette Rossi (in dark grey holding camera) and Zak Sally (far right).

June Julien Misserey and Zak Sally in foreground.

Barbara Schulz and Zak Sally.

Light Grey Art Lab Exhibit
Anders Nilsen & Zak Sally

April Yolando Kasulis, Andrew George, John Wilinski, Jack Kotz,
Marissa Luna, Ben Tye and Kat Bride.

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Autoptic Festival 2015

Tessa Keefe manning my table.

Robin Sheldon & Nick Peters.

Happy daddy, Bart King.

Kitty Berry.

Maddi Gonzalez, Spencer Amundson and Marissa Luna.

Maddi Gonzalez, Spencer Allen Amundson, Marissa Luna,
Melissa Mariko Kieselburg and Andrew George.

Alexis Cooke and Hedwig Vinson.

Mandie Brasington and Jaime Willems.

Tom Kaczynski and Barbara Schulz.

Amaya Goldsmith.

Scotty Gillmer & Caitlin Skaalrud.

Carl Thompson, Scotty Gillmer & Caitlin Skaalrud

Paul Fricke.

Blue Delliquanti

Kyle Harabedian.

Mason Sklar (on right)

Christian Moser and Andrew Herbst (standing)

Erik Munson.

Erik Munson and Chan Chau (standing)

Ann Ryan, John Wilinski, Chase Van Weerdhuizen and Maddi Gonzalez.

Tyler Page

John Bivens and Alex Mitchell

Bryan Bornmueller and Ursula Murray Husted

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Panel discussion

One of the many Autoptic paparazzo.
aka Amaya Goldsmith

Back room for artists to take a breather.

Not many conventions cater to their exhibitors with pastries like these – just saying…

Jim Keefe and his whole crew (Tessa, Anna, Leo and Sophie).

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The view from my table.

And last but not least – the closing ceremony.